Monday, November 10, 2014

Borgia, Blind Faith and Innocence

by M. J. Joachim


A few months back my husband and I started watching a show called Borgia on Netflix. It’s a period series dating back to the 1400’s. Borgia became Pope Alexander VI. His papacy appeared to be about power, fame, fortune, status and family glory. A lot of it was about conquering the New World back then, dividing up lands and taking as many territories as possible through war.

This history of the Church is not necessarily a pretty one, and in many instances, it’s not all that Christian either. That’s not to say that Catholicism isn’t the fullness of the faith. On the contrary, for it is in our weaknesses that we often prevail the most, provided we are open to what our weaknesses have to teach us about ourselves.

Having faith like a child does not mean being ignorant of the blights against us - those imposed on us, or ones we have created ourselves. Even children have an innate sense of right and wrong. They know truth and are capable of understanding when things don’t make sense or contradict each other.

Which is why we must be vigilant in our faith, preserving the lessons Jesus teaches us about it, listening to those who not only subscribe to those lessons, but also who act as if those lessons actually mean something. For indeed they do, and no one knows the heart of a man except the God who made him. Most of us don’t even rightfully know ourselves as well as God does. Yet we carry on as if we have all the answers, blindly expecting others to do the same.

It’s not my place to tell another person how to live. I have enough problems figuring it out for myself, and even when I do good, I often fall far short of what I might have done, if only I had the mind of a child and were able to see the world through innocent eyes.

Thanks so much for visiting Christian Catholic today. Your comments and shares of my work here are always appreciated.

M. J.

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